Category Archives: Emmy’s

Emmy Highlights

Before we get into the clips, a full list of Emmy winners can be found at the Washington Post. There aren’t too many surprises. It gets a little boring reading the list. (Confession: I didn’t watch the awards last night.) Congratulations to Breaking Bad for going out on top. Modern Family won best comedy series and ties Frasiers‘ record for most consecutive wins at five. The only surprise is that the networks and cable shut Netflix out of the race.

Below are three moments: one that’s a mixed bag, one that should be talked about, and one that is being called a highlight.

“Weird Al” Sings Theme Songs

I love “Weird Al” and adding lyrics to theme songs that don’t have them could’ve been brilliant. Instead, we witnessed a hastily thrown together sketch that is awkward to watch. Prepare to role your eyes when “Weird Al” mentions that Game of Thrones has lots of boobs and that George R.R. Martin needs to start writing more, so he doesn’t die before the series is finished.

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The Original “12 Angry Men”

Before 12 Angry Men was a play and multiple movies, it aired in 1954 on CBS as a Westinghouse Studio One teleplay starring Robert Cummings. This version was written by Reginald Rose and directed by Franklin Schaffner. All three men received Emmys for their involvement.

Yes, that is Mr. Roper from Three’s Company as the foreman.

Cool TV Video of the Day: Rod Serling’s “Patterns”

Rod Serling may be best known for The Twilight Zone, but that doesn’t mean his other work is not worth watching. On January 12, 1955, the NBC anthology series Kraft Television Theatre aired Patterns, which marked Serling’s first major success. Not only would Serling go on to win the first of his 6 Emmys, but Patterns became the first drama repeated because of its popularity. However, television was not yet in the habit of recording live television, so the actors had to perform everything over again on February 9, 1955. Fortunately, the second live performance was captured on kinescope.

Jimmy Kimmel’s Emmy Opening and Monologue

While Jimmy Kimmel’s Emmy open is not the best one ever, Kimmel certainly kept true to himself. The open is clever without being brilliant, so how much you enjoy it depends on how much you like Kimmel and his guests.

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Cool TV Video of the Day: Conan’s Emmy Opening

In 2006, Conan O’Brien hosted the Emmy’s on NBC. His hilarious opening parodied several popular shows of the time. The shows featured in order are: Lost, The Office, 24, House, Lost, South Park, and even To Catch a Predator.

The 2012 Emmy Nominees

Earlier today, The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences announced the 2012 Emmy Awards nominees. HBO (81 nominations) and CBS (60 nominations) lead the networks in nominations. Mad Men and American Horror Story (tied with 17 nominations) were shows nominated for the most awards.

Here is list of shows nominated in the major categories:

Best Comedy
The Big Bang Theory
Curb Your Enthusiasm
Girls
Modern Family
30 Rock
Veep

Best Drama
Boardwalk Empire
Breaking Bad
Downton Abbey
Game of Thrones
Homeland
Mad Men

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The Emmys Needs to Change Eligibility Rules For Animated Shows

On Monday, Simpsons writer Al Jean wrote a letter to The  Academy of Television Arts and Sciences asking them to consider reworking the organization of Emmy nominations. In it, he criticized the lack of recognition for the individual achievements in animation. According to Emmy rules, a show nominated in the animation category  cannot also be nominated for a writing award. The Academy’s reason for this is apparently because of the collaborative efforts in animation. If the show so chooses, it can be nominated in the comedy category. Jean took issue with this, citing that NBC’s Community was given a one-time exception to this rule. Because it was a significant format change, it could technically be classified as a standalone special. I saw it and it did not  seem like a standalone special to me. Besides, Jean is right. Animation may be collaborative, but so is everything else in television.

This rule seems to ignore the hard work that multiple writers invest into an animated show. Animation is just as legitimate as the live action medium. Of course, it is a newer format, but that should not make it any less respected. The production of an animated series is much harder than that of a live action series. The writing is certainly not any easier. It makes no sense to have to ignore either one of these achievements.

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